After state elections: winner Gunther wants to continue Jamaica’s alliance

Germany Alliance in Schleswig-Holstein

Surprise in Kiel – Election winner Gunther wants to continue Jamaica’s alliance

CDU wins state election, hopes for NRW tailwind

The CDU clearly won the state election in Schleswig-Holstein – and so Prime Minister Daniel Gunther can go on. On the other hand, the SPD regretted after the poor election result. But now you have to prepare for the state elections of North Rhine-Westphalia.

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Although the CDU can also form a two-party coalition with the FDP or the Greens, it wants to continue ruling with both partners. Thus Prime Minister Günther gives up part of his victory. And for the other two, there are critical hurdles.

meOn the night of Kiel’s election, most still relegated this story to the realm of fantasy. The answers of Christian Democrats and liberal politicians to the question of “impossible,” “does not work,” and “contradictory to democracy” in particular were about whether, despite the election result, despite the clear majority that resulted, they would prefer to expose the alliance of black and yellow As well as the Alliance of Black and Green that it may imagine the continuation of the Jamaica alliance. “Forget it!” Only Stefan Regis, head of the state of the Greens, and Daniel Gunther (CDU), the election winner and prime minister, were more open. That was Sunday evening.

Three days later, the tide had completely turned. According to WELT information, Gunther wants to formally suggest to his party on Wednesday evening that he continue to govern with both former partners over the next five years. The Green Party won 18.3 percent of the elections. and with the Free Democratic Party, which fared much worse at 6.4 percent.

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The evening of the election of the Free Democratic Party to the state elections in Schleswig-Holstein with a statement in Berlin

Elections in Schleswig-Holstein

The CDU of Schleswig-Holstein (43.4 per cent) can form a two-party coalition with both parties. An alliance with the South Schleswig Union of Voters SSW (5.7 per cent) would also be computationally feasible. Basically, there is no better negotiating position for talks on government formation. freedom of choice.

Instead, Günther is again an unusual move rarely practiced in the history of the federal republic: an alliance with a partner who would not, in fact, be needed to form a majority in Parliament. What the bottom line would mean is that Christian Democrats are giving up at least part of their victory, as well as part of the associated design choices and cabinet positions.

‘The idea is charming’

According to party friends, Günther justifies this remarkable decision by the high level of approval that the Jamaica coalition found among the population, according to surveys. According to various Infratest polls, 75% expressed satisfaction with the alliance’s policies. Therefore, the winner of the elections, Gunther, repeatedly noted internally that the union owes unusually good election results not only to itself, but also to its government partners.

And the union wants, next Tuesday, to meet with the two former partners, one by one, to see if the prime minister’s desire for the continuation of the Jamaican alliance can become a reality. There are enough questions. For example, how the increase in the vote of the Green Party and the loss of the LDP vote might be reflected in a future government.

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To date, both smaller parties hold ministerial positions. Should liberals now drop an oath? And does that make you feel like you’re the fifth wheel in the black and green car right from the start? And how will the performance of the “fifth wheel” in the upcoming elections? Will the FDP then be expelled from Parliament? In any case, the fear of such a collapse was still palpable on Election Day evening.

The CDU is now trying to dispel these fears. The leader of the state’s parliamentary group, Tobias Koch, admitted in the NDR that his party would have to relinquish potential ministerial positions if the three-party coalition were to be reinstated. “When in doubt, that will be the outcome.” This waiver is a “small waiver that you bring with you to continue this alliance.”

It is the FDP and, above all, the former Liberal Parliamentary Group leader and current Vice-President of the Bundestag Wolfgang Kubicki, who encourages Günther to continue the tripartite alliance. “Daniel Gunther’s idea of ​​continuing Jamaica is charming,” Kubicki said in Kieler Nachrichten. In the next legislative period, “it is not just about the majority, but about the prospects for the next few years.” The politics of Schleswig-Holstein is also facing very difficult times given the Ukraine war and far from overcoming the consequences of the pandemic.

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Party leader Saskia Eskin

The former leader of the parliamentary Greens, Eka von Kalben, was more skeptical than Kubicki about the planned continuation of the Triple Alliance. Although she doesn’t want to rule out such a star constellation, it’s very difficult to get together “if a partner isn’t needed,” says NDR’s von Kalben. The FDP’s much greater programmatic proximity to the union could heighten green concerns in the context of exploratory talks. After all, it is not impossible for the Greens to eventually become the fifth wheel in a black and yellow car.

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