Northern Story – Sow, Reap and Enjoy – Life in the Teutoburg Forest | NDR.de – TV – Broadcasting from A to Z

For some it is a place to relax, for others it means work: the Teutoburg Forest. Climate change is bothering him now. However, woodland and forest owners, sawmills, mushroom pickers, and hikers appreciate and enjoy what the Teutoburg Forest still has to offer. Nordstory accompanies many people who have a very special relationship with the Teutoburg Forest for half a year and shows their challenges and personal stories.

When Claudia Osters Earlers train with the hound Sunny in her woods, she remembers growing up there as a child and is doing fine. But like many forest owners in Lower Saxony, it has lost a lot of money to climate-related tree death. With her husband she now dared to plant a new forest. But what trees will be able to handle dry summers in the future?

Michael Mok is responsible for private forest owners on behalf of the Chamber of Agriculture in Lower Saxony. He also advises the forester and supports the Osters family: from soil sampling to planting their forests. In addition, the forester coordinates the operations that Stefan Altimöller performs with his harvester. With his two-ton bale, he “harvest” a tree in one minute, free of branches and spreading to a length of 20 meters. Michael Mock must be in many places and always keep an eye on the well-being of the forest.

The Brinkman family, who owns the forest, had the idea to try the wine. On the southern slope of the Teutoburg Forest in Bad Iburg, Jan Brinkmann planted vines on a steep 27-degree mountain. It is the only slope in Lower Saxony approved for viticulture. The highlight of the year is always the harvest season with many volunteers.

How did Heinrich Polthupe and his wife Monica get their three sons to work at the sawmill in Miele? Lars, Chris and Yannic simply enjoy operating the big machines. But it’s also hard work. Due to the good order condition, a tight schedule is set for each day. When a timber truck breaks down in the forest or a high-tech sawmill, which costs millions of euros, breaks down, it is really stressful. These and other stories are told in Nordstory “Sow, Reap and Enjoy – Life in the Teutoburg Forest”.

Also in this bundle of interesting stories from the Teutoburg Forest: we experience a couple gathering mushrooms for their evening meal and a rehabilitation patient hiking in the woods near Bad Rothenfeld to recover.

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Teutoburg Forest: for some it is a place to relax, for others it means work. Climate change is currently affecting the region. However, forest owners, foresters, sawmills, mushroom pickers and hikers appreciate and enjoy what the Teutoburg Forest has to offer.

“die nordstory” accompanies many people who have a very special relationship with the Teutoburg Forest for half a year and shows their personal challenges and stories.

When Claudia Osters Earlers train with the hound Sunny in her woods, she remembers growing up there as a child. She is fine. But like many forest owners in Lower Saxony, it has lost a lot of money to climate-related tree death. With her husband she now dared to plant a new forest. But what trees will be able to handle dry summers in the future?

Michael Mok is responsible for private forest owners on behalf of the Chamber of Agriculture in Lower Saxony. He also advises the forester and supports the Osters family: from soil sampling to planting their forests. In addition, the forester coordinates the operations that Stefan Altimöller performs with his harvester. With his two-ton bale, he “harvest” a tree in one minute, free of branches and spreading to a length of 20 meters. Michael Mock must be in many places and always keep an eye on the well-being of the forest.

The Brinkman family, who owns the forest, had the idea to try the wine. On the southern slope of the Teutoburg Forest in Bad Iburg, Jan Brinkmann planted vines on a steep 27-degree mountain. It is the only slope in Lower Saxony approved for viticulture. The highlight of the year is always the harvest season with many volunteers.

How did Heinrich Polthupe and his wife, Monica, get all three of their sons to work at the sawmill in Miele? Lars, Chris and Yannic simply enjoy operating the big machines. But it’s also hard work. Due to the good order condition, a tight schedule is set for each day. When a truck with logs breaks down in the forest or a high-tech sawing system, which costs millions of euros, breaks down, it is really stressful.

More interesting stories from the Teutoburg Forest: a couple collecting mushrooms for dinner. A rehabilitation patient is hiking in the woods near Bad Rothenfelde to get his health.

Leave a Comment