Paco Sanchez: “Remy Gardner wants to stay with KTM” / MotoGP

Spanish attorney Paco Sanchez is the principal of Joanne Mir and Remy Gardner. He was discredited by KTM for his neutrality against the Factory and Team Tech3. In an interview, Sanchez defended himself against the allegations.

It remains to be seen if Moto2 World Champion Remy Gardner (24) returns to the KTM Tech3 Factory Racing team next year. Because recent negotiations have been affected or even halted due to differences of opinion between Gardner’s manager Joan Meyer and Pete Perrier. Spaniard Perrier was accused of inciting journalists against Tech3 and KTM.

SPEEDWEEK.com met Paco Sanchez at Mugello Field behind the Suzuki Ecstar pits, as he loves to spend time as he also runs two-time world champion Joan Mir. The lawyer tried to calm down, saying he had never given an interview about Gardner’s case.

Baku, if there is no agreement between Tech3-KTM and Remy Gardner, it will be hard to find a place for 2023 MotoGP motorcycles to patronize you.

Yes, at the moment it is definitely difficult to get a place for motorcycles. Because of Suzuki’s withdrawal, there will be two fewer motorcycles at the factory.

I don’t know what happens to Remy. Because we are waiting for KTM’s decision.

Then we’ll see what happens. If KTM decides not to renew Remy’s contract, we will try to find another MotoGP bike. If that doesn’t work, we’ll go to the Superbike World Championship or go back to Moto2.

Or Remy will stay at home. You never know.

But dad Wayne Gardner invested a lot of money in Remy’s career. Entering or retiring from the MotoGP World Championship at the age of 24 is not a strategy for the current world champion Logical.

Yes, Remy thinks the same way. He does not want to resign. surely. Nor is it intended to transform into the Superbike World Championship. He wants to stay in MotoGP. But this decision is not in our hands.

We are now waiting for KTM.

My relationship with them .. There was a misunderstanding due to the media. But there are no personal problems. I spoke to KTM director Jens Heinbach in Mugello on Thursday. I get on with it very well.

I’d also like to meet with Pit Beirer to clarify our relationship. I never had any issues with the people in charge at KTM.

I’m not happy with the conditions, that’s for sure.

But my way of working is always to get the best out of the drivers.

KTM’s job is to get the best out of the factory.

So we have to find a middle ground that satisfies both partners. If you are interested in Remy, we will keep working with you.

Pit Beirer told me he read an interview where she talks about the quality in Tech3 and the financial offer Remy received from KTM for 2023.

No, that is not true. I have never given such an interview with a Spanish medium.

I spoke to English journalist Neil Morrison. Another reporter I didn’t know was standing next to him.

There were two other journalists, Frank Wenk and Lewis Duncan. They digitally recorded the conversation. So it was clear: It wasn’t “informal”.

I mentioned in this conversation that Remy is not happy with the current structure at Tech3. A gender that knows it, Pete knows it, too.

We are not complaining about Tech3. We complain about the current technical staff because Remy is a rookie. His team can’t help him improve in MotoGP.

I don’t know the name of Remy’s crew chief. He is young. I have nothing against it. Problem: Remy doesn’t trust him, and the crew chief doesn’t trust Remy. They don’t really have a good relationship with each other.

This is not criticism; I’m not talking nonsense about the KTM or the Tech3.

Remy’s crew chief is Alex Merhand. Team owner Hervé Poncharale thinks he’s very capable. However, KTM has occasionally changed crew chiefs during the season, including Bradley Smith.

Believes. You are in this position again.

Because Remy is not the problem. The problem is that Remy, Raul and Oliveira’s performance is not enough for them to perform.

Brad Bender’s performance is fairly good, but not perfect.

KTM would like to be in the top five with some riders, but at the moment they are not making it to those positions.

Remy Gardner laments the KTM as a tough bike for a beginner. But for now, all the newcomers in the class are struggling in MotoGP, including those from Ducati and Yamaha, such as Giannantonio, Bezzecchi and Darryn Binder.

The level of mastery is very high now, and the time difference is very small. This complicates the task of every MotoGP rider, not just the novice. For Andrea Dovizioso, Franco Morbidelli and Maverick Vinales, these are really very experienced drivers. They suffer and have problems.

If you lose a few tenths, you will be at the bottom of the ranking today.

It is more difficult for beginners because they are inexperienced, and they do not have a proven recipe for how to improve.

They have a lot of pressure to do this because they do not have long-term contracts. You have five or six races to prove yourself. They hardly have time to show their skills.
You are under a lot of pressure. This is the situation.

I think everyone involved needs to stay calm.

On our part, I can only assure you: we will do our best.

MotoGP and Mugello combined timings after FP2 (May 27):

1. Alex Espargaro, Aprilia, 1:45.891 min
2. Bagnaia, Ducati, +0.049 seconds
3-Miller, Ducati, +0.422.0000
4. Zarco, Ducati +0.458
5- Marini – Ducati: +0.471.2007
6. Bastianini, Ducati +0.504
7. Brad Bender, KTM, +0.548,200,000
8. Pizzi, Ducati, +0.582
9. Quartararo, Yamaha +0.628
10. Paul Espargaro, Honda, +0.727
11. Martin, Ducati +0.738
12. Marc Marquez – Honda +0.767
13. Nakagami – Honda +0.711
14. Rins, Suzuki, +0.772
15. Oliveira, KTM, +0.927.0000
16. Di Gianantonio, Ducati +1,024
17. Vinales, Aprilia, +1162
18- Alex Marquez, Honda +1,260
19. MIR, Suzuki +1.378
20. Pirro, Ducati, +1.541
21. Morbidley, Yamaha, +1.577
22. Dovizioso, Yamaha +1,692
23. Gardner, KTM, +1,793
24. Darren Bender, Yamaha, +1.796
25. Raul Fernandez, KTM +2.107
26. Savadori, Aprilia, +2197

MotoGP, Mugello and FP2:

1. Alex Espargaro, Aprilia, 1:45.891 min
2. Bagnaia, Ducati, +0.049 seconds
3-Miller, Ducati, +0.422.0000
4. Zarco, Ducati +0.458
5- Marini – Ducati: +0.471.2007
6. Bastianini, Ducati +0.504
7. Brad Bender, KTM, +0.548,200,000
8. Pizzi, Ducati, +0.582
9. Quartararo, Yamaha +0.628
10. Paul Espargaro, Honda, +0.727
11. Martin, Ducati +0.738
12. Marc Marquez – Honda +0.767
13. Rins, Suzuki +0.772.72
14. Oliveira, KTM +0.927
15. Nakagami +0.961.37
16. Di Gianantonio, Ducati +1,024
17. Vinales, Aprilia, +1162
18- Alex Marquez, Honda +1,260
19. MIR, Suzuki +1.378
20. Morbidley, Yamaha, +1.577
21- Dovizioso, Yamaha +1,692
22. Gardner, KTM, +1,793
23. Darren Bender, Yamaha, +1.796
24. Pirro, Ducati, +1.835
25. Raul Fernandez, KTM +2.107
26. Savadori, Aprilia, +2197

MotoGP, Mugello and FP1:

1. Nakagami, Honda, 1:46.662 minutes
2. Alex Espargaro, Aprilia, +0.408 seconds
3. Bagnaia, Ducati +0.408
4. Rins, Suzuki, +0.409
5. Bastianini, Ducati +0.524
6. Vinales, Aprilia +0.529
7- Miller, Ducati, +0.653.2007
8. Paul Espargaro, Honda +0.705
9. Zarco, Ducati +0.705
10- Marini, Ducati, +0.721.0000
11. Quartararo, Yamaha +0.731
12. Pirro – Ducati +0.770
13. Alex Marquez – Honda +0.900
14. Besicchi, Ducati +0.922
15. MIR, Suzuki +0.996
16. Morbidley, Yamaha, +1.065
17. Brad Bender, KTM, +1.084
18. Oliveira, KTM, +1.158
19. Marc Marquez, Honda, +1.213
20. Martin, Ducati, +1.241
21- Dovizioso, Yamaha +1.416
22 – Savadore, Aprilia, +1.591
23. Di Giannantonio, Ducati, +1,673
24. Darren Bender, Yamaha +2,248
25. Raul Fernandez, KTM +2.249
26. Remy Gardner, KTM +2,298

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